Wednesday, August 21, 2013

Family Recipes by Syndi Powell

 
 
Does your family have a recipe that gets passed down generation to generation? Or is there one recipe that you make every family holiday because it wouldn't seem like a party without it? In my family, my mom always makes pretzel jello salad. And around the holidays, my husband Jim is known for his peanut butter fudge.
 
In my book "The Reluctant Bachelor", my hero's family owns a pickle factory that employs a majority of the town. Every August, they have a pickle festival with a parade, rides and of course, food. One tent is devoted to pickle delicacies including the favorite fried dill pickles. While the Allyns might have other favorite recipes, I'm sharing this here:
 
Fried Dill Pickles
Ingredients:
Dill Pickles
Seasoned Fry Mix, like Drake's 
2 eggs
1/4 cup of milk or buttermilk
oil
Directions:
Slice the pickles into 1/4 inch coins.  
Put the eggs and milk in one bowl, whip them together.  
Put the fry mix in a second bowl.
On the stove, add oil to a large pot to create a 2 inch deep frying area.
Dip the pickle coins into the fry mix, dip it into the egg/milk, dip it again in the fry mix.  It creates a nice crunchy coating.
Fry the pickles until they are golden to medium brown.
Remove cooked pickles to a plate with paper towels to soak up extra oil.
 
The nice thing about the recipe is you can fry as much or as little as you wish.
 
So now it's your turn. What is your signature recipe? Do you have an old favorite that you bring out at parties? Share your recipe here for a chance to win my book "The Reluctant Bachelor". I'll announce the winner Thursday night.

19 comments:

  1. I've never had fried pickles. They are on my list right under fried green beans. Your book sounds wonderful!

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    1. Aww, thanks, Pamela. Fried pickles are WONDERFUL!

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  2. Too many books I want to read-too little time:) The only meal I can really 'make' is breakfast...so at Christmas time I always make a breakfast casserole of hashbrowns, eggs, ham, cheese, seasonings that I can just toss into the oven while we open presents:)

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    1. Jennifer, that sounds fabulous. I make breakfast for dinner about twice a month, so I hope you don't mind but I'm stealing this idea LOL.

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  3. Oh my goodness, Syndi, I'm so hungry now!!! I've always wanted to try fried pickes and now you've given me the recipe :) My Nona taught me lots of her family Italian recipes but my favorite is a marinara sauce that involves using plum tomatoes par boiled then jarred with fresh basil. Garlic cloves, onion, really good olive oil, salt, pepper and a dash of sugar round out the ingredients. My family says I don't make it enough and since this light, meatless sauce can be used on pizza and tons of pasta dishes, I make a huge batch and freeze portions.

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    1. Oh wow, Karen. That sounds fabulous! I'm a sucker for a good marinara. And my stepson must be part Italian because that's his go to meal.

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  4. Oh, Syndi! You're talking to a serious non-cook, here. The only comfort is that I won your book last week! Actually, the Portuguese have a sausage (linquica) that can be used in anything and has saved me countless times. I use it instead of bacon at breakfast, it makes a wonderful sandwich, split and fried or boiled like a hot dog, and at holiday time, it's the magic ingredient in my turkey stuffing - the only thing I do besides breakfast with any competence. Have to try those pickles, though!

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    1. Okay, I need to find this sausage! I prefer sausage to bacon anyway, so it's right up my alley. Thanks, Muriel. And enjoy the book!

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  5. Like Muriel, I don't cook. David does - he's the perfect chef! Your recipe sounds fabulous though!

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    1. Aimee, what kinds of things does David like to make? What are his specialties? My husband, God bless him, tries to make my life easier by cooking every once in a while but he doesn't have the skills. Still, I appreciate his efforts.

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  6. I ate fried pickles for the first time this year and can't believe how good they are! I don't know that I'll ever make them--as long as I don't fry anything, I pretend I don't eat fried foods--but your recipe sounds great.

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    1. Liz, I've only eaten fried pickles at a restaurant, so I haven't made the homemade ones... yet. This recipe sounds so good and easy though, I've got the ingredients ready for this weekend. LOL. And as weird as they sound, aren't they just golden disks of deliciousness???

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  7. I've noticed fried pickles on the menu at some restaurants lately. Haven't tried them. But I may now that you verify they are good. I'm a non cook, too. My mom and my mother in law were both great cooks. But when my husband was alive he did all of our cooking. Now instead of learning, I eat crap that is microwaveable.

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    1. Let's hear it for microwaveable crap! Yeay!!!

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    2. Roz, you and Aimee are both lucky to have cooking husbands! But I do enjoy cooking. It's like a stress reliever after dealing with working and driving home in traffic. And I agree that microwaveable crap has saved my behind when I get home and am too tired to do more than throw something together and nuke it.

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  8. This sounds delicious, Syndi! I bet the the tanginess of the pickle hits the spot.

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  9. Forgot to add...I already have your book ;).

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    1. Awww, thanks, Rula. I hope you enjoy the book.

      And yes, the tang of the pickle mixed with the fried dough is amazing.

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  10. Karen, you're the winner! I'll email you for details!

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