Tuesday, January 28, 2014

Turn off the Worry Button by Marion Ekholm


How do you turn that worry button off in your brain? This past week has been full of tension and unexpected problems. My son left Wasilla, Alaska, missed the ferry to Seattle and headed through Canada to get back to the states. That’s right. Through Canada in January.

My daughter, son and I share our cell phone service, so he asked me to contact them so he’d be able to use his phone while traveling through Canada. I did. Problem solved.

My second novel needed the art sheet for the cover completed, and I hadn’t looked at the book for six months. While I was rereading it, and attempting to write the required synopsis, my son kept texting me from Canada with some beautiful pictures as well as several short messages.

Here’s a sunrise.  



One interruption after another while I tried to concentrated on my novel. I  must have rewritten that first paragraph a dozen times. Then my daughter joined the mix because she was getting messages from him as well.

Have you ever wanted to toss your phone? I certainly wanted to, but I couldn't. It's my hot spot for getting onto the internet where I was putting in all my information.

Well, obviously my son couldn’t toss his. He needed it to find open camp grounds – that’s right, he’s CAMPING in Canada in January! – or other accommodations, so he’s using his phone to find these things. He gets a warning that he’s using too much International roaming. Guess why? He’s taking more pictures! A bison crossed in front of him. Thank goodness it was during the day when he could actually see the herd of about twelve.

 
 

I contacted the cell phone company and listened to ten minutes of advertisements before a person could help me. I reminded him this was the second time I’d done this. The man was very pleasant and sympathetic. I’ll pay the $15 charges. Problem solved.

Within the hour my son sends me another text. Too much International roaming. His phone’s cut off completely even when he gets to the states. I’m back to the International operator again. Another ten minutes of advertisements. The same sympathy and promise to fix it. This time it’s $30 . Finally, it’s settled, and I’m still on that same first paragraph.

 Another text. This one from the phone company. How did you like your service? Would you recommend us?

I finished the Art Sheet and went off to my job at the community college. There on my desk were three tiny glass animals from my daughter to add to my collection. She knew how frustrated I had been and wanted to brighten my day. She did. 

My son finally made it to the states. He’s now with friends in Colorado.

 

 

14 comments:

  1. This is one of those all's-well-that-ends-well things that you'll laugh about someday, right? Glad your son made it safely.

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    1. I'm sure when I see him I'll find out he had even more problems he didn't want to share with me at the time. But it can all go in a book!

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  2. Hi Marion, glad your son made it safely. I live in Alberta, Canada, so I know how driving can be this time of year.

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    1. I hear how horrible it is on the east coast right now, but he actually didn't have it that bad. Western Canada wasn't having the bitter cold and snow.

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  3. What would have happened had he made the ferry?
    No, hey, we write romance! This is what makes a story.

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    1. The ferry would have had little excitement or problems. You're right. It all goes in a book.

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  4. Marion, Somehow when it's our kids having problems it's worse than if we go through something. That's the down side of motherhood. My mother's stock answer when I was a worry wart about my kids---"I told you to raise parakeets" It's true, she used to say that all of the time. I'm glad your son landed with friends and you got your AFS done. There's your happy ending.

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    1. Mothers can provide such wonderful information. But do we ever listen? Thanks for sharing.

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  5. Someday's life is like this. I'm glad that day is in your past, Marion.

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    1. I wish I didn't think of every possible problem - freezing in the snow, driving into a snow bank, hitting one of those giant beasts!

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  6. Hi, Marion. Whew! Thank goodness your son is well and that your daughter knows when Mom needs an emotional boost. I sure enjoyed the photos. Ron and I have a variation on Roz's mom's quote - "In our next life, we're raising dogs." Congratulate yourself on still managing to focus against difficult odds - you got everything done!

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  7. Those animals were such a delightful surprise. She's a mother, too, so she understands.

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  8. I'm so glad your son made it to his destination. He's a brave soul!

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  9. I can't imagine camping in Canada this time of year! But those are very cool pics and I'm sure he had an unforgettable experience!

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