Friday, May 16, 2014

Coming Home by Cynthia Thomason

Since writing A Soldier's Promise, my May Heartwarming romance, I have become more conscious of news stories about returning veterans. Most of these stories are truly touching. Dads surprising their kids in the classroom, children waiting anxiously just off the tarmac for that special man (or woman) to appear.

In my book, Mike Langston's homecoming was not such a flowery, sentimental reunion. He was called home because his wife was dying, and he had just a few days to say goodbye. His wife had kept the secret of her illness to protect him from harm in combat, but Mike could only interpret her secrecy as a sign of mistrust. Add to that, he rediscovers the teenage daughter he had only know for a few days at a time. Now, Mike Langston is a single dad, with a child he barely knows who is at a crucial time in her young life.

The other day I met a man who served in Vietnam. Like many 19-year-olds, he was thrust into service while still practically a boy learning about life. After months in combat he was injured, seriously, and flown back home to Louisiana where he was from. After weeks of recovery, one day a young, pretty long-haired girl came to the hospital with a guitar. She sang for the soldiers and walked away with the injured veteran's heart. He married that girl and found a happy ending.

I would love to hear your stories about America's heroes. Have you witnessed the heartwarming homecoming of a veteran? Are there more happy endings out there? I'm sure there are. Please tell us.
Cynthia

10 comments:

  1. Cynthia - Good Morning! A Soldier's Promise sounds like a wonderful story with all the critical elements for drama and triumph. I have to add that to my four-mile-long list. Our good neighbors, Curt and Rosemary Johnson, live across the street. Their son, Sean, watched television and ate cookies on our sofa after school whenever the Johnsons were late getting home. It's hard for me to realize that that very same Sean did three tours as a Cavalry Scout - two in Iraq and one in Afghanistan, and survived having two Humvees shot out from under him. He came home, miraculously sound of mind and body and is now a police officer about thirty miles down the coast. He has a beautiful wife and they're expecting their first baby in the fall. I'm so grateful that his story goes on happily, but my heart bleeds for all the stories that didn't. Congratulations on your release.

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    1. Muriel, I'm so happy for Sean too. I wish him the best and glad he's going to be a daddy.

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  2. I haven't heard any stories first hand, but I loved yours.

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  3. It's hard for me to believe how long ago it was that Denny was a marine. He was in the group that mopped up after Korea. I have so many stories in my head about our years in the military. And he didn't stay in for 20 because back then the Marine Corp didn't much like their marines to have wives and families. My nephews and now their kids have served in 1st Iraq conflict and 2nd one, and later ones still in Afghanistan. I support VFW, AM Vets, Paralyzed Vets and Wounded Warriors when I can. The latest news about the mess in our VA hospitals has me thinking about volunteering in their office here to help with paperwork that's woefully in arrears. As Memorial Day is near, I hope everyone can find some way to help or cheer a vet.

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  4. Great advice Roz. I read about the latest mess at the VA hospital - so many soldiers waiting too long for care. You have me thinking about volunteering too. Bless you.

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  5. My husband, Duane, is a Vietnam vet. He wasn't in actual combat and doesn't have scars that show, but layers of bitterness come through sometimes against one faction or another. The father of a classmate mourned the son who went there because even though Randy wasn't wounded, he suffered from PTSD (although it didn't yet have that name). Duane said everyone who went there was changed--no one came home the same. It was worse for Randy and subsequently his family, but no one was unscathed. No one.

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    1. Liz, I'm sure Duane is right. Everyone came home a different person, those lucky enough to come home.

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  6. My dad was army and served in both Korea and WWII.
    Your book sounds awesome. We're so glad you're here!

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  7. Thanks, Pam. My dad served in WWII also. He always said he never expected to come home.

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  8. This sounds like such a beautiful story, Cynthia. The stories I hear about veterans always make me tear up. Every time I watch a video of a soldier surprising his kid at school with a homecoming, I cry.

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