Tuesday, August 16, 2016

Touch Me Not Time...by T.R. McClure

It's the third week of August and the wildflower known as touch me not, or jewelweed, brightens shady creek banks and roadside ditches of Pennsylvania with its orange and yellow tubular blooms. I always look forward to seeing them.

Wanted: The Perfect Mom
was, from the first word to the last edit, known as Touch Me Not.
Native to the eastern half of the United States from Maine to Alabama, the wildflower is a favorite of hummingbirds. Although not substantiated, some say the plant can be used as an antidote for poison ivy.

My editor reminded me not everyone would know to what the title referred. Good point, I agreed. And the new title made sense.


But now, in the hot, steamy days of late summer, I'm reminded of the scene where Holly shows Riley the exploding seed pod - fiction - and of the time my grandmother showed me - fact.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wsc4GfXdCQE


Planning some real-life pictures for this blog, last week Sunny and I set out, as we do most mornings, to walk a nearby, shady road where the plant grows wild beneath the oak and walnut trees. Alas, someone decided the side of the road should be mowed. No wildflowers. No exploding seed pods.

But not to worry. I had a family visit planned for over the weekend 100 miles east. I packed the camera, certain I would find touch me nots galore along my relative's country roads.

And I did. But the camera's memory card was still inserted in the computer back home.

Thank goodness for the cell phone.



 If you live in an area the touch me not calls home, maybe you'll have more luck than I did.

And as always...
Enjoy the read!
T.R. www.trmcclure.com

22 comments:

  1. Thank you for clarifying the title, T.R., because it had me baffled.

    I hadn't heard of touch me nots before so I Googled the name. Although the little yellow and orange flowers in your pictures look familiar, I have never seen an exploding pod. After watching a couple of short You Tube videos, I still haven't "seen" it because it happens so fast that one moment it's there and then it's simply gone.

    Having an inquisitive nature, I was wondering if we have them--jewelweed, being another name for them apparently--in Ontario. Yes, we do. Interestingly, this is what I found out about jewelweed: The sap of jewelweed stems is believed to relieve the itch of poison ivy and insect bites. Good to know, since we do have both poison ivy and a variety of biting insects in Ontario.

    Thank you for the informative post and best wishes with your book, T.R.!

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    1. Dana said and did the same thing :)

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    2. Hmmm . . . great minds . . .! :-D

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  2. I never knew what they were. Thanks for the information!

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  3. They're small but pretty blooms, aren't they? Would love to see an exploding pod. Congratulations on your new book!

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  4. Nature is full of amazing gifts for us. And so are Heartwarming authors! Congratulations on the book; that's such a wonderful cover.

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  5. I've never seen or heard of them, but how cool to maybe catch the exploding pod. They remind me of buttercups that we used to have in the Northwest. But no exploding buttercups. Love your cover. I look forward to reading the book.

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    1. I looked at a US map to see where the plant grows and it looked like they were native to the far NW too.

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  6. Love learning new things. I will remember that if I get into poison ivy.

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  7. Thanks for Kate's explanation. The plant's name sounds so off-putting when in actuality it's a beneficial plant. Anything that can relieve poison ivy itch should have a nicer name.

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  8. I'm going to keep my eyes peeled for the touch me not. I agree with Roz, it reminds me of the buttercup. Sadly, I recently had a run in with poison ivy. Ugh...it was worse than the chicken pox!
    Congratulations on your latest release!

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  9. I loved that scene in the book. I remember my grandmother showing me how you could squeeze snapdragons to make them snap their jaws. And my cousin showed me how to find the drop of "honey" in honeysuckle. I'd love to see the exploding pod, especially in the company of a child.

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    1. Beth, I had forgotten all about snapdragons until I read your reply! And I still get the drop of honey from the honeysuckle!

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  10. I remember touch-me-nots from when I was a kid, but haven't seen any in a long time. Guess I need to take a little trip east of here. Enjoyed your post!

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  11. I have never heard of them. I would have been one of those readers thinking someone in the story must have had sensory issues! But thank you for sharing. I love learning new things :)

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  12. I've never heard of them either. I'm with Amy. I love learning new things :)

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  13. I've enjoyed this plant for years without knowing what to call them, so thanks for sharing their name, T.R.! Love that sweet book cover, too, and can't wait to read the story! Enjoy your weekend!

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