Tuesday, May 9, 2017

Musings on Mother’s Day by Patricia Forsythe



 
Whenever Mother’s Day approaches, I feel nostalgic, missing my mother, my favorite aunts, my mother-in-law. In fact, every woman who influenced me in some way and passed along wisdom and advice comes to mind in May.

Years ago, I heard one of my fellow authors say that almost every book could be enhanced by the presence of a wise older woman.  I try to include one in most of my books since I write about families where the mother or grandmother is a big part of the story and everyone benefits from her life experience.

Recently, I was patting myself on the back for thinking up a new way for a maternal character to impart wisdom without seeming like a know-it-all. Then it occurred to me that I could practice imparting some of my own wisdom. After all, I’ve been at this mom thing for four decades – and I’m something of a know-it-all.
Here’s what I know:

·         The toddler who pulls all of your pots and pans out of the cupboard and then scoots into the farthest corner so you can’t reach him because your vastly pregnant belly is in the way, will then poop his pants and fall fast asleep as the scent of his fragrant offering fills the kitchen – and that’s the exact moment when someone will come to the front door.

·         Mother Nature really fell down on the job by not providing moms with three hands and a head that swivels all the way around. It’s much more effective to give the fishy-eyed stare to a misbehaving child if you can be face-to-face with him. Glaring at said child in the rear view mirror just doesn’t cut it.

·         The number of times the back of your car seat will be kicked on a long trip is in direct proportion to the number of miles you drive. For example, five hundred miles will net you at least twenty five kicks per mile for a total of twelve thousand five hundred kicks. I know this because I counted.

·         Eight year olds are perfectly capable of doing their own laundry and of helping to clean house. If they throw a wet load of clothes into the dryer where there’s already a dry load of clothes, they can then have the privilege of drying, folding, and putting away both loads.

·         Ten year olds can cook. You and your family will eat some awful stuff, but in future years, your daughter’s friends will think she’s a gourmet chef because their mothers didn’t teach them to cook, and your daughters-in-law will love you.

·         If you raise sons, it helps if you collect something you enjoy, but which isn’t too complicated, like salt and pepper shakers, so they know what to give you on your birthday, Christmas, and Mother’s Day. I collect bells and Depression glass (some of which appear above) and my kids have found some lovely pieces for me.

There’s more, but the best piece of wisdom I know is that you always love down. You love your kids more than they love you, and that’s perfectly okay because that’s the way they’ll love their kids – unconditionally. It’s a skill that can be taught.

 Patricia Forsythe is the author of twenty-five books for Harlequin, with many more to come.  She loves creating stories with interesting characters and happy endings.

23 comments:

  1. I loved this post, Patricia! Nuggets of wisdom re motherhood that are pretty universal, aren't they? As I get older (sigh) I too like to include an older woman in my stories - they provide a nice balance and perspective to the impetuousness of youth, I think. Thanks for my early morning smiles!

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    1. You're welcome. This was fun to write.

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  2. What a great post, Patricia! I've been going through the "almost empty nest" stage recently, so I have spent many days crying as I reflect on my children growing up while watching my oldest son prepare to move away from home in August. My youngest son will start 11th grade this fall, and he plans to enlist in the Marines after graduation, so that hasn't helped my feelings at all either. It's a bittersweet time in our lives. I plan on enjoying this Mother's Day as much as I possibly can while I still have them both under my roof. I hope you have a blessed Mother's Day too!

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    1. It's really hard when they move away, but it gets easier with time. After all, we raise them to be independent. Sigh. Enjoy your Mother's Day, too!

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  3. Thank you for the early-morning smile, Patricia, and for sharing the pictures of your treasures!

    Best wishes to everyone for Mother's Day!

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  4. Lovely post, Patricia! With my mother's dementia, I have to keep reminding her that Mother's Day is coming up. Each time, she gets a sweet smile on her face and says, "I thought it was." :)
    Happy Mother's Day, ladies!

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    1. Bless you and your mom on this Mother's Day!

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  5. Great post Patricia. I love my memories also and your comments brought a big chuckle. Always a good thing. I love the idea of a wise woman in each book.

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    1. Thanks, Sandra! Hope to see you sometime soon.

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  6. Happy Mother's Day ladies!! <3

    I, like Patricia, spend the days leading up to Mother's Day reminiscing about my Mom. She died at the young age of 64 after a battle with cancer, shortly before Mother's Day in 2006 and I miss her every single day. She was my best friend, my one continual source of unconditional love, and my biggest inspiration. <3

    If you're a Mom, bask in your day and those treasured children. If you are lucky enough to still have your Mom with you, shower her with the love you feel for her. If you have lost that one true love, treasure the endless memories like I do. *hugs*

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    1. Oh, it's tough to lose your mom, so savor the memories. God bless you and your memories of your wonderful mother.

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  7. I love this post! I often try to befriend women who are older than me because I want to learn from them. They've been here before, and when they get that "uh-huh" smile, I want to know why! :)

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  8. Wonderful pearls of wisdom. I've never had #1 exactly, but certainly similar situations.

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  9. Love the post, Patti! What wonderful nuggets of wisdom you have. I'm still laughing at the image of a toddler sleeping in the back of the cabinet. And I drove 3 children under the age of 8 to Texas and back multiple times (by myself) so you can imagine how many kicks the back of my car seat received. I think I still have bruises, lol. Happy Mother's Day to you!!!!

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    1. Those kicks happen in airplanes too. sigh

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    2. Oh, yes. For me, it was back and forth to Oklahoma! Still, I love those memories.

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  10. Thanks for the smiles this morning. I know about those kicks...and I have several nice Depression glass pieces. :-)

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  11. Hahahahahahahahahah
    The first story is the best. The absolutely best.
    hahahahahahahahahaha

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  12. LOL. This post is great, Patricia. What great fodder for books .

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  13. As always, your post is lovely and funny. I miss my mother and my sister at this time every year, so it makes Mother's Day rather sad. But your imagery of the dirty diaper toddler shall not fade. Oh! Been there! My four great grand nieces could probably Up the ante on the number of kicks. Happy Mother's Day to all!

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  14. So funny and wise. It brought to mind my two toddlers "ice skating" on cookie sheets across the kitchen floor. When they tired of that they'd figure something else out with pots and pans and spoons and spatulas. Best toys ever. And I completely, 100% agree with you on laundry, cooking, and such. Keep those little hands busy with useful things, I say. Thanks for this post. My own mother would have found it most amusing!

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  15. A wonderful and wise post. Thank you for sharing.

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